.danhill

.danhill

I write, write about, and edit comics.

Hey, it’s that guy from Downton Abbey but with red hair. I’ve heard this movie being deemed everything from an heir to 80’s Carpenter movies to “Bourne Identity if it was a horror movie”. Wingard’s “You’re Next” is one of the better horror/slasher movies in recent years (completely subverting the “final girl” stereotype), so I have my fingers crossed.

Comments

Links 02/09/14

The true true size of Africa

Interesting piece on how established cartography undersells Africa’s true size.

My E-mails with Ales, Part 1: Magic, Fungi, PTSD and the Shifting Focus of “ZERO” [Interview]

Nice, Adam Curtis-style, interview/conversation with Ales.

‘Friday Night Lights’ and what it means to be a man

Excellent piece on FNL and the types of masculinity throughout the shows run.

The criminalisation of American business

"So far this year, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs and other banks have coughed up close to $50 billion for supposedly misleading investors in mortgage-backed bonds. BNP Paribas is paying $9 billion over breaches of American sanctions against Sudan and Iran. Credit Suisse, UBS, Barclays and others have settled for billions more, over various accusations. And that is just the financial institutions. Add BP’s $13 billion in settlements since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Toyota’s $1.2 billion settlement over alleged faults in some cars, and many more."

Joseph Brodsky: Listening to Boredom

Great commencement speech on the necessity of boredom.

Plot twist

Great piece on how the brain constructs narratives for itself as a coping mechanism. Including this winner of a paragraph:

"Alice believed that the spirits had chosen her because she was a sinner and a failure, at school and as a woman – in her own words, ‘a hard case’. She became a noted mystic and developed a following. In August 1986, the spirit Lakwena instructed her to conduct a war against the government on behalf of her people. Incredibly, she managed to grow her local following into an army of 10,000, naming it the Holy Spirit Mobile Forces. Having convinced her soldiers that they didn’t need weapons because bullets would bounce off their skin, they fought half-naked, slathered in magic oil. The Ugandan forces fled at the sight of these men and women who were wailing hymns, gripping Bibles and throwing blessed stones. Alice’s troops managed to get to within 80 kilometres of the capital, Kampala, when, during a hopeless final battle, she hopped onto a bicycle and pedalled safely away."

Comments
Chandler wrote the kind of guy that he wanted to be, Hammett wrote the kind of guy that he was afraid he was.
- James Ellroy (via guerreotype)
Comments

A Cast of Pods

A Cast of Pods

Here’s a very abridged selection of recently discovered things I shoot into my ears that are shaped like podcasts:

This one is a recent addition, but it’s fast becoming a firm favourite. Film critic Karina Longworth tells tales of old Hollywood. You enjoy that Devin Faraci penned essay in the back of Brubaker and Phillips Fade Out? That’s the kind of story you’re dealing…

View On WordPress

Comments

Links 01/09/14

Teenage producers and the SoundCloud EDM revolution

The internet - bringing people together.

The future of the BBC: you either believe in it or you don’t

Part of a Guardian report on the BBC. This one concentrates on the type or programming we can expect in the future, and how the BBC wants to start producing shows of the calibre of Breaking Bad, etc.

Where Nobody Knows Your Name: ‘The Swapper,’ ‘Hotline Miami’ and Existential Avatars

Video games and the silent,faceless protagonist.

Click Like You Give a Damn: The Politics of Linkbait and How Feeding on Buzz Ensures a Malnourished Soul

“We have to start shaping the world we want with our clicks, because clicking is a public act.”

Truth.

Comments

Links 31/08/14

It’s time to reconsider Alpha Protocol

It had its issues but Alpha Protocol did some really interesting things with plot, choice and causal effect.

America’s True Colors

Nice post by Noah Berlatsky on the sorely overlooked Morales/Baker Marvel mini-series, Truth.

Psychedelic Comics Hotshot Ales Kot Talks Winter Soldier, Diversity, Ghosts

Great interview with Ales.

FALL DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE OF DISTRESS THAT IS ALFA-ARKIV

I’m kind of obsessed with this game at the moment. It’s very ARG-like in its execution, and the topics it covers are all highly interesting.

How to be Polite… for Geeks

Don’t be a dick.

News on social media suffers a ‘spiral of silence’

Basically, we’re all afraid of being excluded from the pack.

Yes, People Still Read Movie Novelizations … And Write Them, Too

I only ever read the novelization of Empire Strikes Back myself.

The Outlaw Instagrammers of New York City

If you’re on Instagram all of the accounts mentioned in this article are worthy of a follow.

The Troll Slayer

Great New Yorker profile of Mary Beard.

Comments

How TV Ruined Aspiration

Comments
How had I not seen this movie before last night?
How had I not seen this movie before last night?

How had I not seen this movie before last night?

Comments
cinephiliabeyond:

Midnight Marauder's (a brilliant graphic designer/illustrator) Criterion cover for John Boorman’s 1967 classic Point Blank.
Lee Marvin interviewed by John Gallagher (1986). In a rare and comprehensive interview conducted one year before his death, the legendary star reminisces about John Ford, John Wayne, Robert Aldrich, Fritz Lang, Michael Curtiz, Sam Fuller, and John Boorman, and such classics as The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Donovan’s Reef, The Big Red One, The Dirty Dozen, Point Blank, his TV series M Squad, and winning the Oscar for Cat Ballou.

Walter Hill just mentioned recently how much Alexander Jacobs’ script for John Boorman’s Point Blank influenced him.

Alex Jacobs’ script of Point Blank (1967) was a revelation. He was a friend (wonderful guy, looked like a pirate, funny and crazy). This revelation came about despite a character flaw of mine. I have always had difficulty being complimentary to people whose work I admire, when face-to-face with them. This is not the norm in Hollywood where  effusiveness is generally a given. Anyway, a mutual friend told Alex how much I admired Point Blank and John Boorman. Alex then very graciously gave me a copy of the script. This was about the time he was doing The Seven-Ups (1973). Anyway, by now I’d been making a living as a screenwriter for maybe two or three years and had gotten to the point where I was dissatisfied with the standard form scripts were written in — they  just all seemed to be a kind of subliterary blueprint for shooting a picture and generally had no personal voice. Mine were tighter and terser than the average, but I was still working with the industry template and not too happy about it. Alex’s script just knocked me out (not easy to do); it was both playable and literary. Written in a whole different way than standard format (laconic, elliptical, suggestive rather than explicit, bold in the  implied editorial style), I thought Alex’s script was a perfect compliment to the material, hard, tough, and smart — my absolute ideals then. So much of the writing that was generally praised inside the business seemed to me soft and vastly overrated — vastly oversentimental. Then and now, I haven’t changed my opinions about that. But I have changed them about the presentational style.

Anyway I resolved to try to go in that direction (that Alex had shown), and I worked out my own approach in the next few years. I tried to write in an extremely spare, almost haiku style, both stage directions and dialogue. Some of it was a bit pretentious — but at other times I thought it worked pretty well. I now realize a lot of this was being a young guy who wanted to throw rocks at windows. Hard Times was the first, and I think maybe the best. Alien (1979) — the first draft, then when David [Giler] and I rewrote it, we left it in that style. The Driver, which I think was the purest script that I ever wrote, and The Warriors. The clean narrative drive of the material and the splash-panel approach to the characters perfectly fit the design I was trying to make work. Of course all this depend on the nature  of the material; I don’t think the style would’ve worked at all had I been writing romantic comedies. My scripts have always been a bit terse, both in stage directions and dialogue. I think I’ve loosened up in the dialogue  department, but I still try to keep the descriptions fairly minimal, and in some cases purposefully minimalist. I still punctuate to effect, rather than to the proper rules of grammar. I occasionally use onomatopoeias now, a luxury I  would certainly never have allowed myself when I was younger. My favorite description of the dilemma of screenwriting comes from  David Giler, “Your work is only read by the people who will destroy it. —Walter Hill


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//
cinephiliabeyond:

Midnight Marauder's (a brilliant graphic designer/illustrator) Criterion cover for John Boorman’s 1967 classic Point Blank.
Lee Marvin interviewed by John Gallagher (1986). In a rare and comprehensive interview conducted one year before his death, the legendary star reminisces about John Ford, John Wayne, Robert Aldrich, Fritz Lang, Michael Curtiz, Sam Fuller, and John Boorman, and such classics as The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Donovan’s Reef, The Big Red One, The Dirty Dozen, Point Blank, his TV series M Squad, and winning the Oscar for Cat Ballou.

Walter Hill just mentioned recently how much Alexander Jacobs’ script for John Boorman’s Point Blank influenced him.

Alex Jacobs’ script of Point Blank (1967) was a revelation. He was a friend (wonderful guy, looked like a pirate, funny and crazy). This revelation came about despite a character flaw of mine. I have always had difficulty being complimentary to people whose work I admire, when face-to-face with them. This is not the norm in Hollywood where  effusiveness is generally a given. Anyway, a mutual friend told Alex how much I admired Point Blank and John Boorman. Alex then very graciously gave me a copy of the script. This was about the time he was doing The Seven-Ups (1973). Anyway, by now I’d been making a living as a screenwriter for maybe two or three years and had gotten to the point where I was dissatisfied with the standard form scripts were written in — they  just all seemed to be a kind of subliterary blueprint for shooting a picture and generally had no personal voice. Mine were tighter and terser than the average, but I was still working with the industry template and not too happy about it. Alex’s script just knocked me out (not easy to do); it was both playable and literary. Written in a whole different way than standard format (laconic, elliptical, suggestive rather than explicit, bold in the  implied editorial style), I thought Alex’s script was a perfect compliment to the material, hard, tough, and smart — my absolute ideals then. So much of the writing that was generally praised inside the business seemed to me soft and vastly overrated — vastly oversentimental. Then and now, I haven’t changed my opinions about that. But I have changed them about the presentational style.

Anyway I resolved to try to go in that direction (that Alex had shown), and I worked out my own approach in the next few years. I tried to write in an extremely spare, almost haiku style, both stage directions and dialogue. Some of it was a bit pretentious — but at other times I thought it worked pretty well. I now realize a lot of this was being a young guy who wanted to throw rocks at windows. Hard Times was the first, and I think maybe the best. Alien (1979) — the first draft, then when David [Giler] and I rewrote it, we left it in that style. The Driver, which I think was the purest script that I ever wrote, and The Warriors. The clean narrative drive of the material and the splash-panel approach to the characters perfectly fit the design I was trying to make work. Of course all this depend on the nature  of the material; I don’t think the style would’ve worked at all had I been writing romantic comedies. My scripts have always been a bit terse, both in stage directions and dialogue. I think I’ve loosened up in the dialogue  department, but I still try to keep the descriptions fairly minimal, and in some cases purposefully minimalist. I still punctuate to effect, rather than to the proper rules of grammar. I occasionally use onomatopoeias now, a luxury I  would certainly never have allowed myself when I was younger. My favorite description of the dilemma of screenwriting comes from  David Giler, “Your work is only read by the people who will destroy it. —Walter Hill


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

Midnight Marauder's (a brilliant graphic designer/illustrator) Criterion cover for John Boorman’s 1967 classic Point Blank.

Lee Marvin interviewed by John Gallagher (1986). In a rare and comprehensive interview conducted one year before his death, the legendary star reminisces about John Ford, John Wayne, Robert Aldrich, Fritz Lang, Michael Curtiz, Sam Fuller, and John Boorman, and such classics as The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Donovan’s Reef, The Big Red One, The Dirty Dozen, Point Blank, his TV series M Squad, and winning the Oscar for Cat Ballou.

Walter Hill just mentioned recently how much Alexander Jacobs’ script for John Boorman’s Point Blank influenced him.

Alex Jacobs’ script of Point Blank (1967) was a revelation. He was a friend (wonderful guy, looked like a pirate, funny and crazy). This revelation came about despite a character flaw of mine. I have always had difficulty being complimentary to people whose work I admire, when face-to-face with them. This is not the norm in Hollywood where  effusiveness is generally a given. Anyway, a mutual friend told Alex how much I admired Point Blank and John Boorman. Alex then very graciously gave me a copy of the script. This was about the time he was doing The Seven-Ups (1973). Anyway, by now I’d been making a living as a screenwriter for maybe two or three years and had gotten to the point where I was dissatisfied with the standard form scripts were written in — they  just all seemed to be a kind of subliterary blueprint for shooting a picture and generally had no personal voice. Mine were tighter and terser than the average, but I was still working with the industry template and not too happy about it. Alex’s script just knocked me out (not easy to do); it was both playable and literary. Written in a whole different way than standard format (laconic, elliptical, suggestive rather than explicit, bold in the  implied editorial style), I thought Alex’s script was a perfect compliment to the material, hard, tough, and smart — my absolute ideals then. So much of the writing that was generally praised inside the business seemed to me soft and vastly overrated — vastly oversentimental. Then and now, I haven’t changed my opinions about that. But I have changed them about the presentational style.

Anyway I resolved to try to go in that direction (that Alex had shown), and I worked out my own approach in the next few years. I tried to write in an extremely spare, almost haiku style, both stage directions and dialogue. Some of it was a bit pretentious — but at other times I thought it worked pretty well. I now realize a lot of this was being a young guy who wanted to throw rocks at windows. Hard Times was the first, and I think maybe the best. Alien (1979) — the first draft, then when David [Giler] and I rewrote it, we left it in that style. The Driver, which I think was the purest script that I ever wrote, and The Warriors. The clean narrative drive of the material and the splash-panel approach to the characters perfectly fit the design I was trying to make work. Of course all this depend on the nature  of the material; I don’t think the style would’ve worked at all had I been writing romantic comedies. My scripts have always been a bit terse, both in stage directions and dialogue. I think I’ve loosened up in the dialogue  department, but I still try to keep the descriptions fairly minimal, and in some cases purposefully minimalist. I still punctuate to effect, rather than to the proper rules of grammar. I occasionally use onomatopoeias now, a luxury I  would certainly never have allowed myself when I was younger. My favorite description of the dilemma of screenwriting comes from  David Giler, “Your work is only read by the people who will destroy it. —Walter Hill

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Comments
I just finished watching A Hijacking.

This is a much more nuanced affair than Captain Phillips, digging much deeper into the psychology of both negotiation, and being held captive for a prolonged period of time (120 days!).

The editing choices are clever, only adding to the taut atmosphere. It often cuts away from a scene, changing location entirely. We are left to figure out what has gone on by reading the reactions and dialogue of the characters in the next scene.

Noise and sound are important too. Back in Denmark there are often long shots, lingering on almost empty, cold looking offices. Patches of silence punctuate these scenes as men are left to contemplate what their decisions may yield.

The ship itself is often a cacophony of noise, with machinery and the constant chatter of the Somalian pirates simmering away in the background, setting us on edge. In the early days of the ordeal gunfire will often erupt before the ship falls quiet again.

There’s as much time spent in the boardroom and offices of the shipping company as there is on the hijacked tanker itself.

At first, the steely CEO tries to negotiate it like he would any other business deal. But it soon becomes apparent he’s dealing with desperate, unpredictable people. Business 101 has no place here.

We’re even encouraged to sympathise with the him as the mental stress begins to weigh heavy on his shoulders, the lives of the crew in his hands.

There are no Navy Seal teams here to help the crew. No towering, showy central performance. This is an ensemble piece, a movie about a negotiation between two factions, doing their best to get the most out of a shitty situation, and where anything could happen.
I just finished watching A Hijacking.

This is a much more nuanced affair than Captain Phillips, digging much deeper into the psychology of both negotiation, and being held captive for a prolonged period of time (120 days!).

The editing choices are clever, only adding to the taut atmosphere. It often cuts away from a scene, changing location entirely. We are left to figure out what has gone on by reading the reactions and dialogue of the characters in the next scene.

Noise and sound are important too. Back in Denmark there are often long shots, lingering on almost empty, cold looking offices. Patches of silence punctuate these scenes as men are left to contemplate what their decisions may yield.

The ship itself is often a cacophony of noise, with machinery and the constant chatter of the Somalian pirates simmering away in the background, setting us on edge. In the early days of the ordeal gunfire will often erupt before the ship falls quiet again.

There’s as much time spent in the boardroom and offices of the shipping company as there is on the hijacked tanker itself.

At first, the steely CEO tries to negotiate it like he would any other business deal. But it soon becomes apparent he’s dealing with desperate, unpredictable people. Business 101 has no place here.

We’re even encouraged to sympathise with the him as the mental stress begins to weigh heavy on his shoulders, the lives of the crew in his hands.

There are no Navy Seal teams here to help the crew. No towering, showy central performance. This is an ensemble piece, a movie about a negotiation between two factions, doing their best to get the most out of a shitty situation, and where anything could happen.

I just finished watching A Hijacking.

This is a much more nuanced affair than Captain Phillips, digging much deeper into the psychology of both negotiation, and being held captive for a prolonged period of time (120 days!).

The editing choices are clever, only adding to the taut atmosphere. It often cuts away from a scene, changing location entirely. We are left to figure out what has gone on by reading the reactions and dialogue of the characters in the next scene.

Noise and sound are important too. Back in Denmark there are often long shots, lingering on almost empty, cold looking offices. Patches of silence punctuate these scenes as men are left to contemplate what their decisions may yield.

The ship itself is often a cacophony of noise, with machinery and the constant chatter of the Somalian pirates simmering away in the background, setting us on edge. In the early days of the ordeal gunfire will often erupt before the ship falls quiet again.

There’s as much time spent in the boardroom and offices of the shipping company as there is on the hijacked tanker itself.

At first, the steely CEO tries to negotiate it like he would any other business deal. But it soon becomes apparent he’s dealing with desperate, unpredictable people. Business 101 has no place here.

We’re even encouraged to sympathise with the him as the mental stress begins to weigh heavy on his shoulders, the lives of the crew in his hands.

There are no Navy Seal teams here to help the crew. No towering, showy central performance. This is an ensemble piece, a movie about a negotiation between two factions, doing their best to get the most out of a shitty situation, and where anything could happen.

Comments